In response to the Trump Administration’s decision to extend but not redesignate Temporary Protected Status (TPS), Oxfam America’s Humanitarian Policy Lead Noah Gottschalk, said:

By Oxfam

“While we are relieved that the Trump administration has decided to extend protections for approximately 1,250 Yemenis in the US who currently hold Temporary Protected Status (TPS), Oxfam is disappointed that the administration has failed to redesignate the country for TPS, thereby leaving people who came to the US more recently in a precarious legal limbo and at risk of forcible return to the world’s largest humanitarian emergency.

"The US can and must do more to end the conflict in Yemen. Through its continued support of the Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition’s military operations in Yemen, the US has fueled the world’s largest humanitarian emergency, with 24 million people in need of humanitarian aid, including 7.4 million children.

"Nearly five years of fighting have taken a devastating toll on the Yemen’s infrastructure: only half of the country’s health facilities are fully functional and an estimated two million children are out of school. International pressure helped achieve the signing of the Stockholm Agreement in December 2018, but despite this positive step, a year later implementation has been slow and humanitarian needs continue to grow.

"Rather than needlessly fuel the conflict, the US should end its support for the coalition and instead promote peace and protect millions of Yemenis at risk. Oxfam is calling on Congress to pass legislation granting Yemeni TPS holders permanent residency status and a path to citizenship so they can continue to safely live and work in the US without fear of returning to the devastating conditions in Yemen.”

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