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Oxfam condemns Trump Administration decision to terminate Temporary Protected Status for 57,000 Hondurans in the US

By Oxfam

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In response, Vicki Gass, Senior Policy Advisor for Oxfam said:

“Today’s cruel decision will destroy the lives of tens of thousands of people who have worked tirelessly – many for decades – to enrich our society and contribute to our economy. Honduras is already one of the most violent countries in the world; it is inhumane and unconscionable to forcibly deport them to an unsafe country and may put their lives in jeopardy. Moreover, ending this program will severely undermine the government funding to Honduras to address the root causes that force people to leave in the first place – paid by US taxpayers!

“Oxfam condemns today’s decision in the strongest terms and calls on Congress to pass legislation that creates a path to citizenship for all TPS holders from Central America. We also call on the Trump administration to preserve TPS for all remaining countries with TPS designation, as long as conditions in the country of origin are not safe for return,” she said.

Omar Banegas, a 29-year-old TPS holder living in Miami, said:

“My life and livelihood is in the United States. Ending my TPS status and forcing me to return to Honduras is condemning me to a life of fear. After decades of pursuing a life of purpose through music and my local church, I shouldn’t have to start my life all over again.”

Omar came to the US when he was one-year-old for surgery for an eye condition that eventually left him blind.

“I’ve learned to be resilient in the US but I know I won’t be able to access the same type of services and opportunities in Honduras, even if it’s already difficult for me to access them here because of my immigration status. In Honduras, I know I can’t be outdoors after a certain time of night and would be forced to stay inside. Why would the US condemn me to such a fate after everything I’ve done to make my community a better place?” he said.

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