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Eat for Good recipes - Chocolate cake

Only a small percentage of what we spend on food actually reaches the people who farm and produce it. To help, look for products, brands and restaurants that ensure small-scale farmers and workers get a fair deal. This chocolate cake from actress Emily Robinson is made even sweeter by using ethically-sourced chocolate.

Recipe contributed to Oxfam by Emily Robinson​

Ingredients

  • 1 stick + 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 12 oz. ethically produced bittersweet chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 1/3 cup unbleached flour
  • Confectioner’s sugar to garnish

InstructionsPreheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease springform pan. Melt the chocolate slowly. Add butter and sugar, then let cool for 10 minutes. Whisk egg yolks, stir in flour until mixed. Combine chocolate mixture with egg yolks mixture. In a large bowl, beat the egg whites until they form firm peaks. Stir 1/3 of the egg whites in with the chocolate. Then add the rest until there are no streaks. Spoon batter into the pan. Bake in middle of oven for 35–40 minutes. Let cool, garnish with confectioner’s sugar. Chef’s NotesSuggested garnishes include whipped cream and/or raspberries/raspberry sauce. Yield: 1 cake, 12 servings Credit: Emily’s mother. Follow Emily Robinson on Instagram @emilyrobinson SUPPORT FARMERS AND FOOD PRODUCERS: This chocolate cake is made even sweeter by using ethically sourced chocolate. Only a small percentage of what we spend on food actually reaches the people who farm and produce it. For instance, in Cote d’Ivoire, the largest cocoa-producing country, only 7 percent of farmers earned a living income in 2016. Look for a brand of chocolate that guarantees a fair price for small-scale farmers.

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