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Oxfam Clubs

Start or join an Oxfam Club today and find out why we’re on more than 100 campuses nationwide. Oxfam Clubs are a fun, dynamic way to meet fellow students and learn more about the issues—while making a real impact.

"We come from various campuses and carry with us our own unique experiences, but we are all united in our lasting passion for social justice and bringing an end to hunger and poverty around the world." - Glen Van der Molen (Oxfam Club at Virginia Tech) and Brendan Rice (Oxfam Club at University of Alabama)

Oxfam Clubs welcome high school, college, and graduate students. These independent organizations support Oxfam’s efforts to end poverty through all kinds of actions—from volunteering at concerts to organizing events on campus. We’ll equip you with materials, research, training, and ideas to get started.

Oxfam clubs around the US

Connect with Oxfam clubs on Facebook or email us at clubs@oxfamamerica.org to find out if there's an active Oxfam Club at your school or university.

More information

What will my Oxfam Club do?

During the academic year, Oxfam Clubs commit to:

  • Work on a current Oxfam campaign.
  • Host 2-3 events per semester. Oxfam events include: tabling, teach-ins, club meetings, class presentations, panels, movie screenings, lobbying, Oxfam America Hunger Banquets, newspaper articles, concert outreach, and any similar educational, awareness, or fundraising event.
  • Tell us about your events each month via our online Google form.

Collect and share updated member contact information with Oxfam. Sharing this information ensures that all club members receive the latest news about Oxfam campaigns, events, opportunities, and more!

What support does Oxfam provide?

Oxfam will provide clubs with:

  • Regular communications with Oxfam America staff who serve as a resource to students. 
  • Connections to other Oxfam Clubs and local groups.
  • Free materials! "Oxfam swag" includes buttons, stickers, bookmarks, temporary tattoos, bandanas, factsheets, magazines, and brochures.
  • Action guides and toolkits, sample constitution, customized club logo, and club letter of support.

How do I run an Oxfam Club?

Oxfam Clubs are expected to:

  • Be positive representatives for Oxfam in all of your activities and programs and be on message when sharing information about Oxfam's work. You can always contact clubs@oxfamamerica.org if you are unsure about something.
  • Submit collected petition signatures and funds raised to Oxfam America.
  • Utilize available Oxfam resources and materials, provide background information, and give guidance and direction to officers and club members.
  • Take initiative in developing teamwork and cooperation among officers and members.
  • Plan ahead and allow adequate lead team when materials from Oxfam and/or services at your university are needed.
  • Stay abreast of university policies and procedures that impact your club.
  • Ensure continuity from year to year by training new leadership and keeping good records of all organizational activities.
  • Have fun!

Join our community

Sign up to learn how you can help people help themselves in the fight against poverty, hunger, and injustice to stay connected about our work.

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Need help?

Have questions? We’re here to help. Email us at clubs@oxfamamerica.org or call (800) 77-OXFAM x9415.

Tools & downloads

  1. Tools for activists

    How to make a difference on campus

    Students, are you ready to take action? Find tips for starting and running an Oxfam Club at your high school or university, ideas for campus events, and much more.

  2. Tools for activists

    Resources for your Oxfam club

    Access free resources for Oxfam Club members, including a (1) sample club constitution, (2) member contact list template, (3) Oxfam logo guidelines, and (4) spotlight clubs from Virginia Tech and Ball State University.

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