Tabling

Tabling at the MDG Summit. Photo: Jacob Silberberg/Oxfam America

Tabling is a simple, effective way to inspire social change. Besides a table, you'll need a few volunteers and some free Oxfam educational materials (available to print out or order at left). Don't forget sign-up sheets or petitions, clipboards, and pens for each volunteer.

Set up your table in a high-traffic area at an event like a concert, festival, or church bazaar (make sure to get permission first). Put out just enough materials to make the table look interesting and professional; too many materials can become disorganized.

Before you begin, set a strategy. What's the most important message that you want to communicate? Will you be working in teams or individually? Will you be taking turns behind the table? Decide on your "pitch" and practice a few times, keeping it short and straightforward.

As people walk up to your table, smile, say hi, and make eye contact. You may also want to have volunteers step out in front of the table and approach people in the crowd. Rather than trying to reach everyone, focus on those who seem interested in your message. Give your pitch, offering each person a chance to take action and inviting him or her to learn more. You'll be able to spread the word about the issues that matter - and you might even meet a few new friends along the way.


We’ve put together plenty of free materials to help you host an event in your community.

Order materials now

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